All illustrations in the 1st edition were courtesy of CHARLIE JOHNSON

Charlie J has a tremendous talent for knowing how to dig around in your imagination and turn it into art
Faces in Clouds
Faces in Clouds

Our brains have a dedicated area which creates our perception of faces

Gone Fishing
Gone Fishing

Dipping in and out of the hypnagogic state is the perfect way to "catch" lightbulb moments

Inputting Relevant Data
Inputting Relevant Data

It is extremely important to input as much relevant data as possible before you start to trust your instincts in making important decisions you have little experience making

Faces in Clouds
Faces in Clouds

Our brains have a dedicated area which creates our perception of faces

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Sort Your Brain Out Illustrations

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All the drawings in the first edition of Sort Your Brain Out were dreamed up by the lovely Charlie Johnson, usually on the basis of a vague description of each chapter.

 

How he consistently managed to create exactly what we visualised in our mind's eyes with such consistency defies our comprehension.

 

We suspect he may have telepathic powers (despite every attempt to prove the existence of telepathy under careful scientific scrutiny failing miserably).

 

We are extremely grateful to him for contributing his talents to our book - it really helped us to achieve our primary aim - making it as accessible as possible.

brainTUBE3.9_forWebsite.jpg
brainTUBE3.9_forWebsite.jpg

The brain tube map was inspired by the London Underground which Jack has been riding on an almost daily basis for the past 24 years. These images are copyrighted by Neuroformed Ltd.

brainTUBE3.9_forWebsite.jpg
brainTUBE3.9_forWebsite.jpg

The brain tube map was inspired by the London Underground which Jack has been riding on an almost daily basis for the past 24 years. These images are copyrighted by Neuroformed Ltd.

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3D neuroanatomy is not easy to represent as a 2D tube map

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But it was fun trying. This one is from the 1st edition of Sort Your Brain Out, published in 2014.

 

The London Underground is a network of tube tunnels, some running deeper than others.

 

It occurred to us that the highly complex system of 86 billion tube lines that run through your own brain might be more easily understood if it was depicted in a familiar way.

 

This is a view of a brain turned sideways on with the yellow district (Occipital Lobe) at the back of the head and red district (Temporal Lobe) at the side of the head.

 

NB the way different lines link up the different brain stops is conceptual not literal - they are not necessarily physically linked in the brain, but work together to achieve certain functions